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Colombia Huila Luz Dary Polo - Microlot






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Limited Reserved - Colombia Huila Luz Dary Polo - Microlot

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Limited Reserved - Colombia Huila Luz Dary Polo - Microlot

Price:
$28.00

Colombia Huila -  Luz Dary Polo - Special International Women's Day Coffee

Limited Reserved Microlot  

As part of the International Women's Day celebrations on March 8th and the focused activities on women and their contribution to Specialty coffee, we bring you the story of Luz Dary Polo Piaz, a coffee farmer in Huila, Colombia who despite hardship, disadvantaged circumstances and gender inequality, was able to break through and turn her coffee farm to a success story. 

Luz Dary Polo Piaz, mother of 3, has been working in coffee for 13 years, first on her ex husband farm, now her own. She bought Finca Esperanza one year ago, a 2 hectare coffee farm. She built a new raised, covered drying bed and a new upper soaking tank. She built and cultivated this farm to produce specialty grade coffee. She did soil testing and fertilized specifically for its needs. She also picked more carefully, harvesting only ripe cherries which are exposed to 30 hours dry fermentation before pulped, then dried in dryers to 10% moisture content. 

This coffee is a 100% catura, a natural mutation of Red Bourbon varietal. It produces a high yield and more resistant to disease. 

Location - Pitalito, Huila, Colombia
Altitude: 1600-1700 ASL
Temperature - 19-25 degree celsius
Annual rainfall 1600-1900mm
Soil - Volcanic ashes

 Finca Esperanza is a success story nowadays. A single mother deciding to take a chance and invest in a small coffee farm to make a future for herself and her children.

Tasting notes: this coffee tastes like sugar cane, berries and white pepper. 

Available as Espresso Roast

 

More About Women in Coffee:  

Very few know, but women are the front lines of coffee production, providing the labour that most directly affects coffee quality, specifically picking the cherries and sorting defects.

However, they are less represented in trading, exporting, and analysis or lab work. They are laborers, not decision-makers or business owners. Additionally, few women own land or businesses (In fact, an SCAA white paper from 2015 points out that, in some coffee-producing countries, the law limits a woman’s ownership rights.)

In 2016, the UN's FAO reported that women “make up around 43 percent of the agricultural labour force in developing countries” and “are especially disadvantaged, with fewer endowments and entitlements than men, even more limited access to information and services, gender-determined household responsibilities, and increasingly heavy agricultural workloads owing to male out-migration.”

However when given equal access to household resources, women are also more likely than men to invest in family and the future.

“Just giving women the same access as men to agricultural resources could increase production on women’s farms in developing countries by 20 to 30 percent. This could raise total agricultural production in developing countries by 2.5 to 4 percent, which could, in turn, reduce the number of hungry people in the world by 12 to 17 percent, or 100 to 150 million people.” says a 2011 FAO report.

In addition, women in many low-income countries (as coffee producing nations often are) face other challenges, such as a reduced access to adequate health care or education – both in comparison to women in other countries and men in producing countries. What’s more, lower-income and indigenous female coffee producers are likely to have even less access to resources, coffee training, and the business networks they need to improve coffee yield and quality and market their crops.

It’s not just resources and support that women struggle with. Sexual assault and rape on the coffee farm often goes unspoken about, especially in consuming countries. Yet for many coffee producers, it’s a reality – especially for those in positions of less power, such as coffee pickers, migrants, indigenous women, and children.

As is reported in the SCAA white paper on gender equity mentioned above, women often face a “double burden” as they both work on the farm and do housework. “Men were found to have an 8-hour workday, while women worked up to 15 hours per day,” the report says. This is further complicated by women’s growing responsibility on coffee farms – something that represents additional work but perhaps also the potential for greater influence in the future. 

 

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Colombia Huila -  Luz Dary Polo - Special International Women's Day Coffee

Limited Reserved Microlot  

As part of the International Women's Day celebrations on March 8th and the focused activities on women and their contribution to Specialty coffee, we bring you the story of Luz Dary Polo Piaz, a coffee farmer in Huila, Colombia who despite hardship, disadvantaged circumstances and gender inequality, was able to break through and turn her coffee farm to a success story. 

Luz Dary Polo Piaz, mother of 3, has been working in coffee for 13 years, first on her ex husband farm, now her own. She bought Finca Esperanza one year ago, a 2 hectare coffee farm. She built a new raised, covered drying bed and a new upper soaking tank. She built and cultivated this farm to produce specialty grade coffee. She did soil testing and fertilized specifically for its needs. She also picked more carefully, harvesting only ripe cherries which are exposed to 30 hours dry fermentation before pulped, then dried in dryers to 10% moisture content. 

This coffee is a 100% catura, a natural mutation of Red Bourbon varietal. It produces a high yield and more resistant to disease. 

Location - Pitalito, Huila, Colombia
Altitude: 1600-1700 ASL
Temperature - 19-25 degree celsius
Annual rainfall 1600-1900mm
Soil - Volcanic ashes

 Finca Esperanza is a success story nowadays. A single mother deciding to take a chance and invest in a small coffee farm to make a future for herself and her children.

Tasting notes: this coffee tastes like sugar cane, berries and white pepper. 

Available as Espresso Roast

 

More About Women in Coffee:  

Very few know, but women are the front lines of coffee production, providing the labour that most directly affects coffee quality, specifically picking the cherries and sorting defects.

However, they are less represented in trading, exporting, and analysis or lab work. They are laborers, not decision-makers or business owners. Additionally, few women own land or businesses (In fact, an SCAA white paper from 2015 points out that, in some coffee-producing countries, the law limits a woman’s ownership rights.)

In 2016, the UN's FAO reported that women “make up around 43 percent of the agricultural labour force in developing countries” and “are especially disadvantaged, with fewer endowments and entitlements than men, even more limited access to information and services, gender-determined household responsibilities, and increasingly heavy agricultural workloads owing to male out-migration.”

However when given equal access to household resources, women are also more likely than men to invest in family and the future.

“Just giving women the same access as men to agricultural resources could increase production on women’s farms in developing countries by 20 to 30 percent. This could raise total agricultural production in developing countries by 2.5 to 4 percent, which could, in turn, reduce the number of hungry people in the world by 12 to 17 percent, or 100 to 150 million people.” says a 2011 FAO report.

In addition, women in many low-income countries (as coffee producing nations often are) face other challenges, such as a reduced access to adequate health care or education – both in comparison to women in other countries and men in producing countries. What’s more, lower-income and indigenous female coffee producers are likely to have even less access to resources, coffee training, and the business networks they need to improve coffee yield and quality and market their crops.

It’s not just resources and support that women struggle with. Sexual assault and rape on the coffee farm often goes unspoken about, especially in consuming countries. Yet for many coffee producers, it’s a reality – especially for those in positions of less power, such as coffee pickers, migrants, indigenous women, and children.

As is reported in the SCAA white paper on gender equity mentioned above, women often face a “double burden” as they both work on the farm and do housework. “Men were found to have an 8-hour workday, while women worked up to 15 hours per day,” the report says. This is further complicated by women’s growing responsibility on coffee farms – something that represents additional work but perhaps also the potential for greater influence in the future. 

 

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Product Reviews

  1. Excellent Coffe 5 Star Review 5 Star Review

    Posted by on 27th Aug 2017

    Superb coffee, one of the best I have ever tasted. Best for expresso and late.


  2. Fantastic as a Latte 5 Star Review 5 Star Review

    Posted by on 5th Sep 2016

    Just as the description says, this coffee delivers a beautifully balanced flavour as a milk coffee. I will definitely be ordering this again. Thank you Di Bartoli!


  3. Greatbaussie coffee 5 Star Review 5 Star Review

    Posted by on 10th Jun 2016

    Basalt blue is a great full bodied single origin coffee makes a great milky coffee.


  4. Complex, fruity and very enjoyable coffee 5 Star Review 5 Star Review

    Posted by on 27th Dec 2014

    I bought this coffee on recommendation of the service rep at the Di Bartoli store as a great bean and roast for pour-over or immersion brew methods. It was so good that I ordered another 500g online a week later.

    Brewed with a v60 (I haven't tried other methods), it provides an incredibly fragrant and deep chocolate berry-like flavor, with a pleasant tangy bite and plenty of sweetness. It brewed well at 93 degrees with a 13:1 ratio of water to coffee (hand ground, so a higher ratio) and an overall brew time of 3-4 minutes.

    Overall a great first coffee and highly recommended